Through the Heavens

Christmas Eve

Hebrews 4:14-16 – Since then we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. 15 For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. 16 Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

2013-12-24 - Through the Heavens (IMG_7737)The International Space Station passes through the skies over Glacier National Park, Montana on August 13th, 2012.

Though this passage from Hebrews is not one typically associated with Christmas, I find it rather fitting on December 24th to reflect on the two natures of Christ that these verses illustrate.  First, there is his divine nature.  He is the “great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God.”  And yet, despite his divinity he took on a second, human nature.  He became a man, born into the humblest of circumstances.  Because of his humanity, we have a “high priest” who is able “to sympathize with our weaknesses” and “in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.”

We have in Christ a Savior who is both fully God and fully man, Creator of the universe, yet also the babe in a manger.  By his divinity he was able to be a perfect sacrifice wholly acceptable to God, and yet, because of his humanity, he was able to be a substitute qualified to die in our place.  He humbled himself to come down and dwell with us so that we could be reconciled to God through his life, death, and resurrection.

On this Christmas Eve we do well to remember Christ’s dual nature, “Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel” (which means, God with us). – Matthew 1:23

Read more about my “God is Revealed…“ category of posts

© Todd D. Nystrom and Todd the Hiker, 2013.

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