Hiking Indian Staircase

01_IndianStaircaseDistant_IMG_4172Featured Image: View of Indian Staircase from across the valley.

The Lord is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer, my God, my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield, and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold. ~Psalm 18:2

Located about 45 minutes southeast of Lexington, Kentucky, and an easy two to two-and-a-half hour drive from Cincinnati, Ohio, Red River Gorge is a popular hiking and rock climbing destination in the western foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Officially known as the Red River Gorge Geological Area, it is part of the much larger Daniel Boone National Forest.

Red River Gorge boasts some of the most unique and rugged scenery in the region and is also home to over 100 natural rock arches from the small but interesting, to large and magnificent. Spectacular views like the header photo of Indian Staircase taken from across the valley are common throughout the gorge.

Hiking in Red River Gorge

There are numerous official trails in the gorge and sticking to these marked trails is a the best plan if you are new to the area, an inexperienced hiker, or are hiking with children. Even the official trails can be rugged and difficult. There are numerous high cliffs with no guard rails throughout the area, so no matter how experienced you are or what trail you are on, exercise extreme CAUTION. Steep drop-offs are often unseen until you are right on top of them; and if you are hiking with children keep them close by your side at all times! My “Kentucky’s Red River Gorge” page provides more information on the gorge and also highlights several of our favorite hikes on the official trails ranging from easy to difficult.

For more experienced, knowledgeable, and confident hikers the gorge offers great opportunities to explore challenging, spectacular, unofficial trails like those around Indian Staircase. Many of these trails are not suitable for children, and climbing Indian Staircase is at the top of that list in my book. Many adults may also be intimidated trying to climb the staircase. Fortunately, those who do not feel adventurous can still explore the area above Indian Staircase, but you will need to hike a little farther and double back, taking the same route on the return trip, thus avoiding the exposed ascent or descent of the staircase itself.

CAUTION:  The route up Indian Staircase is extremely dangerous and I do no recommend hiking it unless you are experienced and prepared for the strenuous and exposed climb to the top. Also, the area above the staircase has an extended area of exposed cliffline that is dangerous, as well. If you have any reservations at all about the climb/scramble up the exposed rock face of the staircase I suggest taking the alternate route to the top and even then you need to exercise great caution and avoid venturing too close to the cliff edges. Do not become another statistic by being foolish! Respect the real dangers that are present, pack out anything that you pack in, and please avoid adding your artistic flair to the rocks and trees in this beautiful and sensitive area!

Hiking Indian Staircase

Red River Gorge - Indian Staircase (Trail Map)Figure 1. Map of Indian Arch and vicinity.

Good topographic maps are a must if you are venturing off the official, marked trails in the gorge. I am a big fan of the map set offered by OutrageGIS, though the 2009 edition I use does not cover the trails around Indian Staircase. I do not know if the 2013 edition has been updated to include this area. For this hike I relied on the US Forest Service’s 2012 topographic map of the gorge (note: this is a 20 MB .pdf file and is a slow download). This is a good map, but it does not show any of the unofficial trails, though I have sketched in the relevant trails on the modified map section shown in Figure 1. The best source of information for this hike was Jerrell Goodpaster’s book, “Hinterlands,” which describes over 100 unofficial trails in the gorge.

02_BisonWayTrailhead_IMG_4098Bison Way Trailhead.

There are several ways to access Indian Staircase if you know the unofficial trails. We chose to park at the Bison Way trailhead along KY-715, near the Gladie Learning Center. We hiked the Bison Way Trail (#210) to the Sheltowee Trace (#100) and followed that west to the unofficial, unmarked approach trail to Indian Staircase. The approach trail is well traveled so it is not too difficult to find the cutoff or follow the trail itself.

03_IndianStaircaseTrail_IMG_4213Start of the Indian Staircase Trail. On the day we were there someone had scratched out an arrow in the dirt indicating the way to Indian Staircase.

04_IndianStaircaseApproach_IMG_410705_IndianStaircaseApproach_IMG_4108Two views of the rock scramble approaching Indian Staircase.

The approach trail climbs rapidly, heading northwest off the main trail. After a bit of uphill hiking you reach a rugged dry wash area that requires a scramble up the rocks. After completing this scramble there are several short sections that require a bit of searching in order to find the best way up to the next level. In my opinion the most intimidating part of climbing the staircase for the first time is that your sight range is often limited and you cannot see what lies ahead.

06_IndianStaircase_IMG_4111Carved footholds in the smooth sandstone face of Indian Staircase.

The final element of intimidation, though, is the fully exposed scramble up the smooth sandstone rock face with only the shallow carved footholds to assist you. This, of course, is the section of the trail that gives the rock formation its name. As legend has it these indentations were carved by the Adena people over a thousand years ago, though their true age and origin is likely lost to the annals of history. The slope is not as steep as it first seems, and the climb does not take ropes or climbing gear, but the completely exposed face adds a major intimidation factor. No matter how comfortable you might feel on exposed rock slopes, I would not recommend this climb if it is wet or icy!

07_CouncilChamber_IMG_4153Council Chamber rock shelter.

08_FrogsHead_IMG_4137Frog’s Head Rock, sadly defaced by budding sculptors over the years.

Even if you do not climb the staircase itself, it is still worth taking the long way around to get to the top by following the Sheltowee Trace and coming in from the west. There are a number of great features to explore in the area above the staircase including a spectacular, large rock shelter known as the Council Chamber, and an interesting little rock formation called the Frog’s Head. Regardless of which route you follow, I also recommend taking the unofficial side trail (one mile round trip) out to Adena Arch which boasts some spectacular views of its own.

09_AdenaArch_IMG_4190Adena Arch.

10_IndianArch_IMG_4202Indian Arch, on the return hike along the Sheltowee Trace.

There are more areas we did not have time to explore on this hike, including the area on top and to the east of the staircase, as well as some interesting sounding features a friend told me about that are beyond the point we turned back near the Council Chamber rock shelter. I look forward to another hike on this route, not only to venture into these unexplored areas, but also to give the staircase a better assessment without the first-time intimidation factor, and to take more photographs documenting the climb. For now, I hope this gives you enough information to find your way on this adventurous hike and that my photographs will inspire you to make the trip to explore this spectacular little corner of Red River Gorge!

© Todd D. Nystrom and Todd the Hiker, 2015.

Note: This article was also published as a guest post on the Rocky® S2V™ Blog on February 18, 2015.

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2 thoughts on “Hiking Indian Staircase

  1. If you continue thru the Council Chamber rock shelter, a trail follows along the side of the cliff, below the ridge line, that eventually hooks back up with the trail at the top of ridge (before you get back to the Sheltowee trace). Really nice views along cliff looking back at the staircase.

    • Thanks, Barry. I have been back since I originally wrote this and have hiked out past the Council Chamber. One of these days I need to update my page to include this part of the trail, as well.

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